Post Graduate Options

Employment

Some of you will have had enough of schooling for now and want to go directly to work. That is a fine choice, so long as you do not end up in a job that can lead nowhere. Sometimes, students who do not intend to go to college or career-training institutions think they do no have to plan. However, these students, more than any others, need to talk to their guidance counselors early about how to be ready for meaningful employment after graduation. Only planning can get you into a career and not just a job. The Guidance Department can be of assistance in helping you find employment after high school.

Armed Services

Recruiters from all branches of the services are eager to persuade you of the advantages of acquiring either career training or education through the military. If you need to earn money immediately, if you would like to travel, or if you need an organization to teach you self-discipline, the Armed Services may be for you. There are opportunities for advancement for both men and women. Every branch offers educational benefits and tuition incentives that your counselor will help you to investigate.

Vocational, Trade or Career-Training Schools

Your guidance counselor can suggest the names of reputable schools where you can study everything from piano tuning to advanced electronics. You should know that eligible students use federal grants for career schools as well as for college tuition. We strongly suggest to all students that they consult with their guidance counselor before signing a contract or placing a deposit at a career-training school.

Community Colleges

The Massachusetts Community College system offers a wide range of career-oriented courses tostudents at a reasonable cost. Most have very good job placement records for their graduates, who receive an Associate’s Degree and training in some career area. Others may want to attend a local community college for the first two years and transfer to a four-year college to complete the Bachelor’s Degree requirements.

Community colleges are part of a state’s public higher education system and primarily serve local students and local needs. Flexible schedule options allow part-time study, night classes for working students and developmental courses to transition into four-year colleges. An open enrollment policy allows any high school graduate or GED recipient to enroll. Tuition and fees are generally lower than public or private four-year colleges and universities.

Junior Colleges

Though it is very similar in purpose to the community college, the junior college is private, more expensive, and usually residential. Most junior colleges offer an Associate’s Degree program where the student has a choice between transferring to a four-year college or selecting a career option.

Four-Year Colleges

Whether it is a state college, state university, or private college or university, the four- year college experience culminates in a Bachelor’s Degree – B.A. or B.S. These institutions vary a great deal and your guidance counselor can help you to choose among them. Beware of making premature judgments about colleges before you have really investigated them.

Private colleges and universities range in size, and many specialize in a certain area, such as fine arts, liberal arts, business, or the hard sciences. Private colleges and universities receive endowments from private donors instead of from federal or state resources.

Public, state colleges and universities offer a broad range of academic options. They are funded primarily through state and federal sources. Tuition and fees are generally lower than at private schools.

Service Academies

The Army, Navy, Air Force, and Coast Guard all have academies that are similar to four-year colleges in some ways. Each academy is very specialized and all have a component of required military service. Entrance to the academies is very competitive, both intellectually and physically, and requires congressional appointments by the local congressman. Preliminary inquiries about service academies should be made during the spring semester of one’s junior year.

R.O.T.C. (Reserve Officers Training Corps)

The four largest branches of the United States Military offer military training in college in conjunction with a student’s four years of baccalaureate work. Competitive scholarships (full and partial) are available through R.O.T.C. as well as pay (monthly) for the military training. At the conclusion of four years of college, an R.O.T.C. student is commissioned as an officer and has threeor four year enlistment duty in the service.

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